Magazine article The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE

Keep Mars and Venus Apart for Learning's Sake

Magazine article The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE

Keep Mars and Venus Apart for Learning's Sake

Article excerpt

Segregating male and female students could lead to better results for both sexes, a psychologist at Manchester Business School has claimed.

Paul Irwing, reader in organisational psychology, said he had reached the "reluctant conclusion" after conducting research into gender differences.

He argues in a paper, "The Distance Between Mars and Venus: Measuring Global Sex Differences in Personality", that character traits are more divergent than is commonly supposed.

Although he conceded that there were benefits to educating men and women together, he said that segregation should be considered because of the different approaches male and female students take to learning. "I am increasingly convinced that what may be right for a large group of males is different from what is good for the vast majority of females," he told Times Higher Education.

Dr Irwing said it was good that women were achieving more educationally, but that this had come at a cost to men because the difference between the genders was not widely acknowledged.

The paper contends that there is only a 10 per cent overlap in the personality traits of the sexes. …

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