Magazine article Stage Directions

You Say Tomato, I Say Go Cue 5,384

Magazine article Stage Directions

You Say Tomato, I Say Go Cue 5,384

Article excerpt

A touring production with too much going on uses technology to simplify

When the design team for the inaugural production of You Say Tomato, I Say Shut Up!, by Annabelle Gurwitch and Jeff Kahn, sat down for theirfirst design conversation, everything sounded pretty simple. It was a small, two-person touring show: unit set, props and costumes should fit into a couple of roadcases, minimal lighting requirements, a few atmospheric sound cues, that sort of thing. The requirements quickly grew, however. Set in the framework of an anniversary dinner, the play details the trials and tribulations of the couple's relationship in hilarious vignettes covering first meeting, courtship and marriage as it travels back and forth in time and location - a challenging sequence fora small tour. By the time the show opened in Charlotte there were nearly 100 light cues, half a dozen practicáis and around 50 sound cues, all needing to be run by one operator over the course of a 75-minute show.

In addition to the number of cues, there was the issue of transporting everything, so the control system had to be compact enough to fit into the same roadcases alongside the props and costumes. And everything had to be linked precisely enough together for a stage manager to call cues that frequently landed right on top of each other. In order to handle all of that, the design team leaned on QLab, a Mac-based show control system that is completely scalable and can run lighting, video and up to 48 channels of audio. …

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