Magazine article Variety

Eye-Candy Locales Develop an Edge

Magazine article Variety

Eye-Candy Locales Develop an Edge

Article excerpt

Bond films are often defined by their scenes' foreground: tailored suits, beautiful women, that ever-present martini. Yet, much of the franchise's iconic aesthetic comes from the background as well. Exotic locations are de rigueur in every Bond pic - though the franchise's definition of "exotic" has evolved over the decades.

The Bond backgrounds, according to Anthony Waye, longtime location manager and assistant helmer for the Bond franchise, were to take people to "places they'd never seen," but that was easier when "Dr. No" opened in 1962. Then the term "jet set," really meant something. James Mond's freedom to book aplane at u moment's notice and decamp for Turkey, Japan or Switzerland had a definite "wow" factor.

"The famous 'Dr. No' scene of Ursula on the beach (in the Caribbean), it was a great visual, " Waye says.

But with 101 million Americans holding passports and international travel more common, the "Dr. No" beach scenes "nowadays wouldn't have such an impact," he says. Recent Bond pics have featured more challenging settings, such as Kazakhstan (doubled by Spain), the Chilean desert and North Korea (shot in Hawaii and Britain) - still places people have never seen, but not dream vacation spots.

Speaking from his office in Turkey, where he returned from retirement to manage a location for "Skyfall," Waye recalls shooting "GoldenEye" in Puerto Rico (subbing for Cuba) on the Arecibo radio telescopes. "They were stunningly visual massive receivers and of course virtually no public would ever get to see that. …

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