Magazine article Variety

The Wild Ones

Magazine article Variety

The Wild Ones

Article excerpt

FILM BUEMOSAIRES

The Wild Ones

LOS SALVAJES

Argentina

The elemental power of Argentina's Mendoza foothills and the struggle of juvenile delinquents on the lam cant compensate for an obvious story structure and overcooked symbolism in Alejandro Fadel's writing-directing debut, "The Wild Ones." Divided into two halves - starting with the flight of a quintet of youths from prison, followed by the group's dissolution - the pic establishes seemingly strong, even grand, setpieces that go nowhere, indicating a filmmaker of considerable technical abilities falling short in the scripting department. Fabulous look and settings will help the pic go far on the feet circuit.

The action launches immediately and furiously, without character intros, as five teens break out of a juvie facility, killing some guards in the process. Group leader Gaucho (Leonel Arancibia) promises a seven-day hike on foot to his godfather's home, and the brisk eight-minute prelude is followed by a more languorous pace.

Once on the trail, the pic's apparent intentions to delineate the various characters never crystallize beyond Gaucho's bullheaded determination to lead and control the group, while Demian (Roberto Cowal) increasingly resists what he thinks is Gaucho's incompetence - a notion the movie hasn't taken the time to sufficiently develop.

Fadel tries in vain to wrestle some meaning out of a situation centered around young people who lack any kind of compass, literal or moral. One by one, each of the five begins to peel off from the movie's center, leading to a final 20-minuteplus stretch burdened with repetitive action. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.