Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

UDC Wins Law School Accreditation, Ordered to Honor Faculty Labor Agreement

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

UDC Wins Law School Accreditation, Ordered to Honor Faculty Labor Agreement

Article excerpt

WASHINGTON - After a longfought attempt to secure accreditation for its law school, the University of the District of Columbia (UDC) was granted provisional accreditation from the American Bar Association (ABA) on February 2.

The next day, the historically Black institution was ordered by a U.S. district judge to honor a labor agreement which was ignored when UDC was forced to fire 125 faculty members last year.

The vote by the ABA's House of Delegates reversed an earlier decision to deny accreditation to the financially troubled public institution. UDC now has three years in which to meet all the requirements needed for full accreditation.

The decision also means that forty first-year students are now eligible for government-backed education loans. They had been denied that eligibility because, unlike second- and third-year students, they were not considered enrolled in an accredited program.

The ABA's accreditation committee had voted the previous week not to grant accreditation to UDC. That vote followed an August 1997 decision that stripped the law school of its accreditation. The committee, however, informed the HBCU at that time that it would be allowed to restate its case at a later date.

"We worked...very long under great stress and pressure, fighting budget cuts and threats from Congress," UDC Law School Dean William Robinson told The Washington Post. "It feels very good."

According to Robinson, the House of Delegates reversed the accreditation committee's recommendation because new financial and operational information was provided. …

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