Magazine article The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE

Leon Trotsky: A Revolutionary's Life

Magazine article The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE

Leon Trotsky: A Revolutionary's Life

Article excerpt

Leon Trotsky: A Revolutionary's Life. By Joshua Rubenstein. Yale University Press, 240pp, Pounds 18.99. ISBN 9780300137248. Published 26 January 2012

Leon Trotsky remains a compelling and controversial figure for historians, with two major biographies since 2009. Bertrand Patenaude's Stalin's Nemesis: The Exile and Murder of Leon Trotsky is a marvellous, critically empathetic evocation of a life through the lens of its last years. Robert Service's Trotsky: A Biography tells an exciting tale marred by intrusive authorial animus. Joshua Rubenstein, in contrast, has synthesised recent research in a measured essay modelled on Irving Howe's 1978 synoptic text and published as part of a series called Jewish Lives. Trotsky was a "non- Jewish Jew" who identified himself existentially as a revolutionary Marxist. Unlike Joseph Nedava, who assumed from Trotsky's interest in "the Jewish question" from 1934 that, had he lived, he would have endorsed Zionism, Rubenstein does not force matters. He integrates Trotsky's hostility to anti-Semitism and Zionism into an account of a career in which they were usually peripheral, highlighting them where necessary.

The influences that created a revolutionary internationalist, Trotsky's conflicts with the Bolsheviks, his leading role in the Russian revolution of 1905 and his partnership with Lenin in 1917 are recounted with insight. This Trotsky is neither saint nor Satan. Rubenstein does him justice as an intellectual and a man of action: he captures the brilliance, courage and grandeur of a meteoric rise. He documents Trotsky's contribution to the theory of permanent revolution that informed the 1917 revolution and his key role as military organiser and strategist in the civil war that preserved it. He underlines his advocacy of revolutionary violence and opposition to individual terrorism. For Rubenstein, like earlier historians, rejection of democratic values was Trotsky's tragic flaw. War, encirclement and faith in international revolution meant repression could be considered temporary. Trotsky was not Stalin. But institutionalised denial of democracy after 1920 facilitated Stalinism. Ultimately, progress towards socialism requires freedoms that can thwart it.

The outcome of the ensuing Stalin-Trotsky struggle was not predetermined: the cards fell in Stalin's favour. As revolutions misfired elsewhere, his move towards "socialism in one country" and its social base trumped Trotsky's internationalism. …

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