Magazine article National Parks

Letters

Magazine article National Parks

Letters

Article excerpt

FINDERS KEEPERS

The art of Richard Lang and Judith Selby Lang ["Found Objects"] is such a lovely concept! This was an amazing and inspiring article and video. What wonderful people, to have this vision and share the possibilities of the reuse of what some may call trash. My mother, who grew up during the Depression, taught us not to throw away anything that could be reused. She reminded us how her family saved tin foil, twine, and flash bulbs, which they painted with Russian folk designs and used as Christmas tree ornaments. Thank you for these memories. What a wonderful refresher and reminder to open one's eyes and envision the possibilities of all that surrounds us.

"AUNT BETTY"

via npca.org

The Langs reinforce the idea that beauty can be found in the most unlikely of shapes, forms, and places. You only have to open your eyes to appreciate its message.

"LATUNA7"

via npca.org

Thank you for this video and the article in your magazine- very inspiring on many levels. Please keep up your art-related articles. We really enjoyed the art from the Japanese internment camps ["The Art of Gaman," Fall 2011], too!

ANONYMOUS

via npca.org

A SLIPPERY SLOPE

As a new subscriber to National Parks, I was surprised and delighted to find John Grossman's article, ["Slip Sliding Away," Denizens] in the Summer edition of the magazine. The role played by the American eel and the eastern elliptio freshwater mussels in keeping the Delaware River healthy and clean is one of the most fascinating balance-of-nature stories I've ever come across. This article was particularly illuminating because my wife and I recently spent a delightful summer weekend swimming and rafting on the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River. While immersed in the river you can't help but notice the rocky riverbed, which, as I learned from the article, is prime eel habitat. What a tragedy it would be if hydraulic fracturing and its attendant ground disturbance lead to a habitatdestroying siltation- driving away the all-important eel and mussel population. The Upper Delaware River is a mesmerizing natural resource; here's hoping that fracking concerns don't compromise it for future generations.

PAUL CLARKE

Tarry town, NY

I just finished reading the Summer issue of National Parks and as usual, I enjoyed the variety of stories, especially "Slip Sliding Away. …

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