Magazine article Campaigns & Elections

The CENGA Generation and 2012

Magazine article Campaigns & Elections

The CENGA Generation and 2012

Article excerpt

They were so hopeful four years ago. I called those Americans born between 1979 and the early 1990s "America's First Global Citizens." Regardless of the year Barack Obama was born (1961), he was going to be their president - planetary in sensibility, multiethnic, both genetically and in terms of outlook, and well-traveled.

Based on our survey numbers, 66 percent ofthat group had active passports and 44 percent said they "expected" (not hoped or wished) to live in a foreign capital at some point in their lives. They were also by far the least likely to believe that American culture was inherently superior to other cultures, and the most likely to see that the United States was not going to be able to play the role of a dominant empire worldwide.

I remember them well from my vantage point as an employer, too. They had options, so they wanted to plot a path in their interview to become chief operating officer in three or four years. They multitasked and networked with their friends worldwide. As they did, they changed the workplace and they changed how problems are solved (horizontally, not vertically). They saved money for their respective companies and they often preferred some form of NGO involvement to a summer picnic. Perhaps, from time to time, they were a little challenging on the respect front. After all, they had been everywhere and done everything. But I loved it.

I wrote a lot about these Global Citizens in my 2008 book, "The Way We'll Be: The Zogby Report on the Transformation of the American Dream." The good news is that the global outlook is still there. They are the most diverse and the most aware of any of the age cohorts. They may not know where Darfur is on the map, but what makes them so different from all other age cohorts is that they know there is a Darfur on the map.

But sadly, it's the hope, the confidence and the plan to become COO that's now missing. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.