Magazine article The Spectator

Treating Islam with Special Reverence Is Cultural Suicide and Just Plain Wrong

Magazine article The Spectator

Treating Islam with Special Reverence Is Cultural Suicide and Just Plain Wrong

Article excerpt

My brilliant niece Freya was talking to my brother the other day about the religious education curriculum at her predominately white, middle-class state school in a pretty English cathedral city. She happened to mention 'Mohammed, Peace Be Upon Him.' 'Eh?' said my brother. 'It's what we're taught at school. After we mention "Mohammed" we have to say "Peace be upon him".'

Now I know what you're thinking: that Freya must surely have got the wrong end of the stick. 'If this were a madrassa in Bradford, well maybe, ' you'll be thinking. 'But at a white, middle-class state school in a pretty English cathedral city? No way. Things aren't that bad. At least not yet, anyway. . .'

But Freya is not stupid. That's why, at the beginning, I referred to her as my 'brilliant' niece as opposed to my 'incredibly thick' one. Apparently, she assures me, they've been taught to use the 'peace be upon him' formula since Year 7 and though they're allowed to shorten it to PBUH, they're definitely not supposed to call him just Mohammed. 'There's sometimes the odd snigger when the phrase comes up but we've been conditioned pretty much to accept it as normal, ' says Freya. 'It's a bit weird, given that there's only two Muslim kids in my year of 100.'

I find this scary for at least two reasons.

The first is what it says about the death of our national identity. When Freya's father and I were at school, we had to go to 'chapel' once a day, and twice on Sundays. In our scripture classes we were taught all the key bible stories, even to the point of having to learn the names of all the apostles. It didn't turn us into religious freaks - anything but.

What it did instil in us, however, was a sense of history and tradition. Like generations before us we were members of the Anglican Church, familiar with the same tales, the same liturgy, the same hymns and psalms, the same rituals, the same boredom.

Before the 1980s, I suspect, this was the experience of most British children, regardless of their race or religious background.

It wasn't a question of forcing Christianity down anyone's throat - merely an accepted part of the fabric of British life. You went to church (at least occasionally - Christmas at any rate) in the same way you watched Top of the Pops and Morecambe and Wise, or you had roast beef and Yorkshire pud for Sunday lunch. It just was what you did.

Not any more. Sure, the old religion is still covered in RE classes, but at state schools like Freya's only as an equally valid and certainly by no means preferable alternative to Judaism, Sikhism, Islam and the rest. 'Jesus was the son of God! Do you agree? …

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