Magazine article Work & Family Life

To Keep a Young Child from Choking

Magazine article Work & Family Life

To Keep a Young Child from Choking

Article excerpt

Many of the nearly 3,000 Americans who die every year from choking are infants and children who were well cared for-except for the brief moment when a piece of food or a small object lodged in their throat and prevented them from breathing.

"Anything bite-size or larger, or any food or object that does not melt or break down easily, can obstruct a baby's windpipe if it is accidentally inhaled instead of swallowed," writes New York Times health columnist Jane Brody. Thus, Cheerios are safe for babies starting to feed themselves but raisins are not. Brody lists the following food hazards: grapes (for kids 4 and under, remove the skin and quarter the grape), nuts (not for children under 6), carrots (puree for children 2 and younger, cook to soften for those 3 and older), celery (never raw for kids 4 and under, bite-size for 5- and 6-year-- olds), peanut butter (not for children under 4, spread thinly for kids 4-6), hot dogs (not for children under 3, remove skin and cut into small pieces for older children) and hard candy (not for children 4 and under). …

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