Magazine article Times Educational Supplement

MFL - Les Roses Sont Rouges: Resources - Secondary

Magazine article Times Educational Supplement

MFL - Les Roses Sont Rouges: Resources - Secondary

Article excerpt

Writing poetry is a creative way to become versed in a language.

When I was 14 years old, I submitted a rhyming poem in my French class about bad hair days. My teacher returned it with an icy stare and accused me of mocking her unruly, curly bob (... frise, boucle, he he he! ...). Whether my poem was actually an attack on her, or a self-conscious lamentation over my own teenage coif, I truly can't remember. The poem itself, however, and the French, has stuck with me to this day.

Towards the end of the last school year, TES Resources user An Gulinck shared a French poetry workbook that reminded me of my bad-hair poem. Her workbook offers ideas on how to prompt pupils to write their own poems in the target language.

Voltaire said: "One merit of poetry few persons will deny: it says more and in fewer words than prose."

By asking pupils to write poems in a foreign language, teachers can set vocabulary and grammar parameters to meet specific lesson objectives. Honing in on adjective agreement, I give pupils a formula to create their poem ...

Line 1: noun; line 2: same noun + is or are + adjective; line 3: same noun + is or are + adjective 1, adjective 2; line 4: is or are + adjective 1, adjective 2, adjective 3; line 5: adjective 1, adjective 2, adjective 3, adjective 4; line 6: new related noun.

Here is an example in English:

Chocolate

Chocolate is lovely

Chocolate is lovely, rich

Is lovely, rich, sweet

Lovely, rich, sweet, wonderful

Satisfaction

In my Year 7 classes I like to use haikus following a simple 5-7-5 syllable pattern. …

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