Magazine article The Spectator

ANCIENT AND MODERN Classical Press Regulation

Magazine article The Spectator

ANCIENT AND MODERN Classical Press Regulation

Article excerpt

Forget Leveson.

If the press, always keen to be above the law, must remain free of state control (and it must), it cannot expect state protection. It must be prepared to bear the wrath of the individuals it lies about and smears. Time for an Athenian solution.

Since there was no Crown Prosecution Service in Athens, the state prosecuted no one. All prosecutions, whatever the charge, were brought by individuals against other individuals, and strenuous efforts were made to settle a case before it ever came to court.

If that failed, proceedings were carried out in a court with no clerks, barristers, rules of evidence, or even a judge, but simply a panel of randomly selected Athenian citizens aged over 30. For the litigants, it was each man for himself. The injured party and the defending party personally gave speeches of the same length; laws were quoted, evidence read out (no cross-questioning); and without further discussion, the panel voted on the verdict.

The point is that the state was not taking anyone on; it was simply providing the legal framework for the settlement of a personal dispute between two individuals (hence all the efforts to settle it privately beforehand). …

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