Magazine article American Forests

Water Logged

Magazine article American Forests

Water Logged

Article excerpt

Logging always seems to engender debate, but in communities along the Ottawa River in Canada, the practice has taken on a less controversial, more environmentally sound tone.

A Canadian-based company, Logs End Inc., is going underwater to recover lost timbers from abandoned mills, factories, homesteads, and lumber camps. The old-growth logs sank in the Ottawa River in the late 1800s during a time of heavy logging in Canada.

After 150 years the logs are still in pristine condition, thanks to low water temperatures and the age and quality of the wood. The "recycled" wood is being sold for buildings, furniture, and flooring.

The Ottawa River was a major transportation route for the old-growth red and white pines logged from forests along the banks of the Ottawa River beginning in the 1870s. Arriving in Quebec City the logs were sawn into lumber and shipped around the world. By the turn of the century, as millions of logs were floated down the river, many sank and were never recovered. …

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