Magazine article Humanities

Around the Nation

Magazine article Humanities

Around the Nation

Article excerpt



"Talking Birds, Feathered Serpents, and Painted Women: Casas Grandes Ceramics" will continue at the Tucson Museum of Arts through February 16. The exhibition highlights the pottery from Paquime, in northern Mexico, created between 700 and 1450 A.D. Programs at the museum will include a talk on "The Miracle of Mata Oritiz: The Story of the Pottery Village" on January 9, and "Males and Horned Serpents, Females and Birds: Duality in Casas Grandes Cosmology" on January 26.

Works by thirty photojournalists will be on exhibit at the University of Arizona's Center for Creative Photography until March 2. "Americanos: Latino Life in the United States" contains 120 photographs portraying the Latino experience. Art and photography librarian Miguel Juarz will present "Chicano Mural Art" on February 6; sociology professor Celestino Fernandez will speak about "The Art and Culture of Low Riding: Automobiles in the Mexican American Community" on February 11; and librarian Bob Diaz will discuss "Latino Music Traditions" on February 16.


"Dilemmas in Health Care," a new series in Colorado, addresses issues in medical ethics. As part of the series, a community hospital forum on death and dying will be held in Estes Park on January 24. The programming will include a reading and discussion series, a theatrical reading, and a mock trial.


The humanities find a forum on public access television. See page 34.


Robert Baker Aiken has been a leader of Zen Buddhism in America since he founded a Buddhist society in Honolulu in 1959. There will be a public forum at the Japanese Cultural Center in Honolulu on January 24 to announce the transfer of Aiken's papers to archival storage at the University of Hawai'i's Hamilton Library. The forum features religion scholar Helen Baroni, who will discuss the development of Zen Buddhism in the United States.

"On the Eve of Statehood, Oral Histories of the Farrington High School Class of 1959," is a presentation that will look at the year Hawai'i became the fiftieth state and how that event affected the lives of young adults. The project was conducted by the University of Hawai'i Center for Oral History. The event will be held January 29 at the Salt Lake Moanalua Public Library.

Nine hundred photographs recounting the eighty-five-year history of the Hilo Boarding School, established in 1851, are being indexed and preserved. The Lyman Museum in Hilo will hold a program in late January to discuss the images and what they reveal about the school and its community.


"Frank Stella: Had Gadya Series," the artist's interpretation of the Jewish folksong sung at Passover, will be on view at the Spertus Museum in Chicago through February 24. In conjunction with the exhibition, there will be a brief course on the Haggadah, the book used during the Passover ceremony. It will be held January 9, 16, 23, and 30 at the museum. On February 11 at the museum, Rabbi Byron Sherwin will give a lecture on the topic of original sin in the Haggadah.

Ballet Quad Cities will give several presentations on the historical and literary foundations of dance. The first of the series will be "Dancing in Art" on January 13 at the First Baptist Church in Rock Island. "Celebrate Dance" will be presented on February 2, 9,15, and 23 at CommUniversity and St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa. "Dancing through the Centuries" will be presented on February 4 at Augustana College in Rock Island, and "The Art of Dancing" on February 10 at St. Ambrose University and on February 26 at the Buchanan Center for the Arts in Monmouth.

Capitol Forum Teaching Training will take place on February 3 at Starved Rock State Park in Utica. Educators will address four themes: the environment, immigration, conflict resolution, and the global economy. …

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