Magazine article Drug Topics

Optometrists Say Consumers Often Choose Wrong Eyedrops

Magazine article Drug Topics

Optometrists Say Consumers Often Choose Wrong Eyedrops

Article excerpt

Many consumers don't see eye-- to-eye with optometrists when selecting nonprescription drops for various eye ailments, according to a recent survey commissioned by Bausch & Lomb.

In a poll of 1,000 consumers and 100 optometrists, 63% of consumers reported experiencing burning, itchy, dry, tired, or watery eyes in the past six months. Although 74% knew that different drops are available for these problems, they most frequently fixated on redness relievers.

To relieve dry eyes, 97% of optometrists recommended using artificial tears. But only 10% of consumers reported using them, and 44% chose redness relievers instead. For itchy eyes, 83% of optometrists recommended using allergy decongestant eyedrops, while 66% of consumers used redness relievers for the condition. Most consumers (52%) also chose a redness reliever for eye fatigue, although 91% of optometrists recommended using lubricating eyedrops.

What's wrong with this picture? According to Rhonda Robinson, O.D., president of Schuff Robinson Optometry in Speedway, Ind., a redness reliever may mask symptoms rather than alleviate them. "It will make their eyes look less red, and then, after a while, the drops wear off and their eyes get red again, they put more drops in," she said. …

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