Magazine article The New Yorker

Hizzoner

Magazine article The New Yorker

Hizzoner

Article excerpt

Every weekday, Edward Irving Koch, the unshrinking, garrulous, and easily mimicked but otherwise sui-generis hundred-and-fifth mayor of New York City, rises at 6 A.M. and gets busy doing what he does best--being Ed Koch. More than two decades since leaving office, he remains confident of the consistent noteworthiness of his public utterances. Last week, he made news just by shaking off a touch of pneumonia and showing up for his eighty-eighth-birthday party, at Gracie Mansion. On a typical morning, he arrives at his desk, in Rockefeller Center, by eight-fifteen (or half an hour earlier, if he hasn't stopped at the gym along the way). Until he leaves, at four-thirty, he spends most of his time writing: miscellaneous articles, letters, e-mails, and movie reviews that he publishes online or delivers on-camera, for Shalom TV. "I like to think that I'm one of the few people in public life who write their own material. I write every word," he said recently. "And I really enjoy writing--especially my political commentary."

Hizzoner's weekly political commentaries, which he composes on Sundays, while he's still in bed, turn up the following day on the Huffington Post and Newsmax. Everything he publishes gets distributed to an e-mail list of six thousand recipients, and he reads and responds to everything in his in-box. His routines include a weekly television appearance on NY1 with the impeccably reputable Alfonse D'Amato and Eliot Spitzer; a one-hour call-in show every Friday night on Bloomberg Radio; a fifteen-minute gig with D'Amato that's broadcast several times each weekend on Bloomberg; and two I-pay-for-my-ticket-like-everybody-else weekend visits to movie theatres.

Viewable this February at a theatre near you--provided you reside within the gravitational pull of the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge--will be "Koch," a ninety-five-minute documentary directed by Neil Barsky. Three years ago, Barsky, a former Daily News and Wall Street Journal reporter turned securities analyst turned hedge-fund manager turned guy who does whatever he pleases, approached Koch's former chief of staff, Diane Coffey, with a proposal to make a film about his mayoralty, which he pitched as "a love letter to New York." Though the two men hadn't previously met, Koch agreed to cooperate, with the stipulation that he could see the film before its release and register any complaints.

It turned out that he didn't have any. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.