Magazine article Stage Directions

Dressing the Stage

Magazine article Stage Directions

Dressing the Stage

Article excerpt

EDITOR'S NOTE

Perhaps one of the most eagerly awaited theaters soon to be unveiled is the Colosseum, a $95 million 4,000-seater housed in Las Vegas' Caesars Palace. Future home to pop superstar Celine Dion's new three-year show slated to bow next month, the Colosseum is a ect example of an architectural trend that's been taking the theater community by storm-forging a sense of intimacy within the most palatial of venues. This design tenet, so eloquently addressed by fabled theater consultant/lighting designer Richard Pilbrow (see SD August 2002) in Naomi Starobin's article on his work, seems to be the underpinning of what guides the construction of theaters today. And yet, as Claude-Andre Roy, principal theater designer of the Colosseum, explains in Erin Auerbach's story on this magnificent space (Theater Space, page 26), the mission and challenge of the project were to create a superbly equipped theater that was both majestic and quaint while striving to make the performer/audience dynamic as cozy as possible. From the look of the design team's brainchild, as seen on the cover and in the feature, it has more than exceeded its expectations and then some.

Speaking of the interior of a theater, as we emphatically stated last month when our focus was on costuming, makeup and special effects, a production would be aesthetically desolate, denuded like trees without leaves, if these components were conspicuously missing onstage. Such would be the case if the sets, scenery & rigging were similarly absent. …

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