Magazine article The Spectator

Dear Mary

Magazine article The Spectator

Dear Mary

Article excerpt

Q. Having invited two old friends to lunch, I was irritated to see them bearing little packages of food, claiming that they were both suffering from `food intolerances' and so had brought some provisions along as they would almost certainly be unable to eat much of what I had prepared. They then picked their way through the superb (though I say it myself) lunch on offer, supplementing here and there with their own fetish foods but they weakened when I brought out some extremely expensive Swiss chocolates. After reference to the diagram, they agreed amongst themselves that there were certain sweets to which they would not be 'allergic', and they tucked in. They added that since they had eaten so little of the preceding courses it would be all right for them to have three or four chocolates each. The consequence was that I, having allowed them to take `allergy precedence', was left with the only two chocolates I can't stand: the one with nougat and the one with cherry cream filling, for myself. How should I have curtailed their excesses, Mary?

PA., London WI

A. It is a sensible precaution, when offering chocolates to alleged food allergy sufferers, to hide the guide and claim to have thrown it away. `Oh, it's right at the bottom of the rubbish bag,' you can lament. `Did you really want me to go through it or can you just take pot luck. . . ?' With no means of knowing which potential nugget of paradise contains the most 'toxins', your guests will find it simpler to wave the whole box aside, Q. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.