Magazine article Variety

An R/x for Intrigue

Magazine article Variety

An R/x for Intrigue

Article excerpt

AN R/X FOR INTRIGUE

FILM: SIDE EFFECTS (OPEN ROAD)

Director: Steven Soderbergh; Cast: Jude Law, Rooney Mara, Catherine Zeta-Jones, ChanningTatum

What begins as a barbed satire of our pill-popping, selfmedicating society morphs into something intriguingly different in "Side Effects." Steven Soderbergh 's elegantly coiled puzzler spins a tale of clinical depression and psychiatric malpractice into an absorbing, cunningly unpredictable entertainment that, like much of his recent work, closely observes how a particular subset of American society operates in a needy, greedy, paranoid and duplicitous age. Discriminating arthouse audiences not turned off by the antidepressant-heavy subject matter should be held shrink-rapt by what Soderbergh, after years of flirting with retirement, has said will be his last picture "for a long time."

[establishing ;i mood of grim foreboding with a brief glimpse of a blood-spattered domestic scene, the film rewinds three months to the incident that sets things in motion. Emily Taylor (Rooney Mara), a New Yorker in her mid208, awaits the prison release of her husband, Martin (Channing Tatum), a former business exec who has just finished serving four years for his involvement in an insider-trading scheme. But the couple's happy reunion is complicated not only by Martins period of readjustment and unemployment, but also by Emily's ongoing struggles with anxiety and depression.

The story is thus immediately rooted in an easily recognizable and, for some, relatable world of financial difficulty and pharmaceutical overreliance. After Emily's condition declines to the point of attempting self-harm, she sees a psychiatrist, Dr. Jonathan Banks (Jude Law), who puts her on a try-this-try-that regimen of drugs that include Prozac, Zoloft and Ablixa The names of these antidepressants and their assorted side effects are rattled off with cheeky proficiency in the well-researched script by Scott Z. Burns ("Contagion," The Informant!"), and soon Emily starts to manifest the byproducts of so much medication, including nausea, a heightened libido and a disturbing habit of sleepwalking.

Soderbergh's sinuous HD camerawork (done under his usual pseudonym, Peter Andrews) maintains an unnervingly intimate focus on Emily in these early passages, dominated by breakdowns and consulting sessions. Yet even in inlense elosenps that enable Mani to vividly register Emily's panic, fear and vaguely suicidal impulses, the direction has a certain cool-toned detachment that keeps the film from becoming a wholly subjective portrait of mental instability. That distanced quality persists even when Emily's behavior, under the influence of Ablixa, takes a shocking turn for the worse.

At this point, the dramatic perspective shifts to Banks, who suddenly finds himself professionally compromised as a provocative question comes to the fore: If a patient is not responsible for actions taken under the influence of a powerful drug, does the liability shift to the doctor who prescribed it? But as Banks launches himself into an increasingly obsessive quest to clear his name, leading him into private conversations with Emily's former therapist, Dr. Victoria Siebel (Catherine ZetaJones), the peculiar feeling persists that not everything about the case may be what it seems.

The very title of "Side Effects" - a suggestion of unintended, undesired consequences that distract from the matter at hand - provides a clue as to the level of narrative misdirection Soderbergh and Bums are up to. …

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