Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Progress Slow for Minorities, Women among Ranks of College Presidents

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Progress Slow for Minorities, Women among Ranks of College Presidents

Article excerpt

WASHINGTON -Despite some progress, the appointment of women and minorities to college and university presidencies over the past decade has been exceedingly slow, according to a report by the American Council on Education (ACE).

The report, The American College President: A 1998 Edition, is the third in a series on the backgrounds and career paths of college and university presidents. The other two reports were done in 1986 and 1990.

Based on surveys of higher education leaders who were in office in 1995, the report found that most of the nearly 2,300 college presidents were White maLes, averaging fifty-six years of age, with a doctoral degree. This profile has not changed dramatically in the past ten years -- except they are slightly older and have served longer in office.

Although women hold a greater percentage of leadership positions than they did in past surveys (9.5 percent in 1986 and 11.8 in 1990), they represent just 16.5 percent of all presidencies in 1995. Women were also more likely than men (64.1 percent to 45.9 percent) to have served in their current position for five years or less. Additionally, they were more likely to head a coeducational institution than a women's college, and more likely to serve at a public institution than a private one. …

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