Magazine article Sea Classics

Send in the Albany!

Magazine article Sea Classics

Send in the Albany!

Article excerpt

A century ago, a daring mission in China was undertaken by an American cruiser

Often there are warships that accomplish much, yet their deeds are not sufficiently newsworthy to warrant more than a footnote in Naval history. Such was the case of the protected cruiser USS Albany (CIj-23). The cruiser was actually built in Great Britain by Armstrong Whitworth, and launched on 19 January 1899. What is interesting is the fact that the Albany was being built for the Brazilian Navy and to be christened as the Almirante Abreu. However, Assistant Secretary of the Navy Theodore Roosevelt arranged to purchase the vessel in early 1898 while still on the ways. Naval Intelligence had learned that the ship was to be sold to the Spanish Navy, and as war with Spain was imminent, it would be imprudent to allow a modern cruiser to be added to their rather poor fleet of obsolete ships. She was named the Albany, and commissioned in the United States Navy on 29 May 1900.

The Albany was deployed to a variety of areas in the world during its 22-yr career. As a protected or light cruiser, she had the pedigree for almost all tasks required of a Naval vessel on foreign station. At a length of 354-ft, the 3500-ton cruiser was capable of 19.5-kts, and was armed with six 6-in guns in the main battery backed up by four 4.7-in weapons. In addition, the cruiser packed the punch provided by ten 57mm Hotchkiss guns. Rounding out this impressive battery were three torpedo tubes for 18-in anti-ship torpedoes. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.