Magazine article Humanities

Editor's Note

Magazine article Humanities

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

Even as a kid, Martin Scorsese, the 2013 Jefferson Lecturer, was blurring the line between entertainment and art. Growing up in Queens and on Manhattan's Lower East Side, he was taken by his parents to the movies and became a fan of Westerns. After the family bought a TV in 1948, some quirk of local programming allowed him to see Paisan and The Bicycle Thief and he became a fan of Italian neorealist cinema.

His passion for film history is well known, and so is his interest in history, period. The Gangs of New York recalls downtown thugs who ran the streets around the time of the Civil War. The Age of Innocence recalls the Gilded Age of New York's Four Hundred. The Aviator, Raging Bull, and Goodfellas draw on nonfiction sources and span decades.

Like many thinkers of a historical bent, Scorsese has a passion for authentic details and for preservation of cultural resources. With grants from the Film Foundation, which Scorsese established in 1990, more than five hundred films have been painstakingly restored and rereleased.

And what about Scorsese's own place within the history of our culture? His movies have helped elevate filmmaking to a position of equality with literature and other arts in the American tradition. His preoccupation with American character and the moral contortions it undergoes in the search for fame, glory, and pleasure places him deep in a dark critical tradition stretching back to Poe and Melville and Fitzgerald. …

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