Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Minority Numbers Down at Top Texas Schools

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Minority Numbers Down at Top Texas Schools

Article excerpt

SAN ANTONIO, Tex. - Minority students in Texas are still going to college in about the same numbers even though fewer are heading to the state's top universities, according to a study by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

The preliminary report, released earlier this week, was requested by state representatives as a measuring stick for minority access to higher education and the effects of the Hopwood decision. The 1996 federal case resulted in the halting of affirmative action policies at Texas's higher education institutions.

The coordinating board report found that the number of minority students attending Texas colleges did not change dramatically in the year following Hopwood. But the report also found that many minority students were attending smaller colleges closer to home instead of heading to the University of TexasAustin or Texas A&M University in College Station.

"The student who was in El Paso and who wanted to go to Austin stayed home," Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board member Carlos Villa of El Paso said. He expressed the worries of other board members who are concerned that minority students might view the state's top two public universities as inaccessible. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.