Magazine article Sculpture

SAN FRANCISCO: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon

Magazine article Sculpture

SAN FRANCISCO: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon

Article excerpt

Eli Ridgway Gallery

Though Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon's exhibition "No Touch" explored the interrelationship of space and sound, it was the translation of sound into visually beautiful, "fine art" objects that acted as the siren's call, luring us in for a closer look and listen. Stepping offthe hustle and bustle of Minna Street, viewers entered the quiet of the lobby, which has become an important transition space in which gallery owner Eli Ridgway orchestrates a program of rotating installations. The narrow hallway, with its dark reverberant flooring leads to a storefront, aluminum frame door, which, for Gordon's show, opened to reveal her first installation, Untitled (Fantasy II).

At the center stood an object with all the telltale signs of an abstract sculpture-angular lines, larger-thanhuman size, simple, non-decorative forms-but rendered in the stuffof a suburban corporate interior: acoustic foam, felt, and wood. Two speakers, pointed toward opposite sides of the object, played an array of popular music, though no one was listening. The directed-sound technology projected a focused beam of sound akin to the beam of a flashlight in which light tunnels directly ahead rather than illuminating an entire space. In this case, the sculpture's soundabsorbing materials deadened the soundtrack, which was pointed directly at it. The only way to hear the music piece was to plant oneself directly between a speaker and the central form. Two abstract wall works created from melamine foam acoustic panels completed the elements in this space. Though "colored" in the non-color of a construction product that typically slips anonymously into ceilings, these large-scale "tiles" took on a presence of their own.

A series of steps led down into the space below for Gordon's second installation, Searching for Vespers (LD 1-4). Here, she playfully inverted the relative positions of object and speaker. Four speakers pointed outward from the center of the space, facing four objects of differing acoustic properties: glass, steel, plaster, and cement. …

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