Magazine article The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE

Unwholesome Ingredients in Exeter's Success Recipe

Magazine article The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE

Unwholesome Ingredients in Exeter's Success Recipe

Article excerpt

Institution's senior management pledges to tackle 'stress-inducing' culture. Elizabeth Gibney reports.

League table success at the University of Exeter may have been gained at the expense of staff, who claim to have experienced "undue stress", "bullying", sexism and a "loss of voice", according to an internal report.

A group convened at the request of management and led by Nicky Britten, professor of applied healthcare research at the institution, has identified a "top-down management" culture as a source of problems at Exeter.

Based on 288 responses from the university's 3,900 staff, the report says that many people found the senior management team remote, with major decisions being "made by a small group of people behind closed doors without consultation".

"The tone of communication (described as 'hectoring') might have been appropriate for managing underperformance ten years ago, but is inappropriate now," reads the report, which was presented to the university's council, alongside the senior management's response, on 21 February.

Many staff felt their opinions were ignored, "with no acknowledgment or feedback", it adds.

The group also documents "some alarming reports of bullying, manipulative and unpleasant behaviour" by particular senior managers and a feeling among some that the university "is a self-perpetuating male-dominated culture" with policies such as maternity leave not taken seriously.

"There are reports of men making casual sexist remarks ... referring to women as 'girls', promoting men over women (despite the women having equal or better CVs)," it adds.

The investigation was initiated after the university's wider staff survey of 2012, which found that 36 per cent reported feeling unduly stressed, compared with a benchmark figure at universities conducting the same survey of 28 per cent.

The survey also found that only 60 per cent said they felt able to voice opinions, compared with a sector benchmark of 76 per cent. …

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