Magazine article New Internationalist

A Ferocious Sense of Entitlement

Magazine article New Internationalist

A Ferocious Sense of Entitlement

Article excerpt

A revealing set of studies in the US has got URVASHI BUTALIA thinking about how the rich in India behave.

My office is located in an urban village in the heart of Delhi. Originally surrounded by fields where people grew crops, these areas now house apartment blocks and shopping malls. All that's leftof the old village is the cluster of houses in which many of the erstwhile residents live, and where a few small traders have set up offices and shops. Some old practices remain though, and there's a strong sense of community. Come evening, houses in Shahpur Jat empty as women and children spill out on to the narrow streets where a village haat - a market where you can get fresh vegetables, fruit, fish, eggs, plastic goods and virtually anything else you care to name - springs up. Or at least, that's how it was until about a year ago. I still remember the day that marked the beginning of the end of this little daily ritual.

It was around 6 o'clock on a late summer day, not yet dusk. As people shopped and went from cart to cart selecting the best and sometimes the cheapest, cars and autorickshaws negotiated the narrow gaps between them, taking care to avoid children and animals.

Then along came a large SUV, driven by a young and obviously wealthy man. He honked loudly for people to get out of his way; no-one really bothered. He tried again, he leaned out of the car and shouted, he revved up his car. No effect: the cart standing nearby was doing brisk business, another one went past and gently grazed his car. Suddenly, before anyone could realize what was happening, this young man leapt out, caught hold of the cart ladenwith-onions standing in front of his car, tipped it over, spilling its contents on to the road, lifted the heavy metal scales and hurled them at the vendor, who just managed to duck and escape being badly injured. People scurried away, the young man stalked off, climbed unhurriedly into his car and drove off. Since that day, the village market has disappeared, the people are too frightened to come on to the road, children don't play there and cars can now drive freely down it.

This isn't an unusual scene in India and it's not about road rage. It's about being rich, and the privilege, callousness and arrogance that comes with it. It's something I've always wondered about: the rich have so much, what does this wealth do to their minds that they always want more, they don't want anyone else to have anything? Indeed, why does wealth make them lose all sense of humanity and compassion?

Let me tell you another story: my neighbour in the upper-middle-class area where I live is a man who owns luxury hotels. His house is huge, but no sooner had he moved in than he appropriated about half of the pavement space to the front and side of his house, claiming it for his own. This means less parking for others, less pavement for children, less walking space for everyone. Of the 400-odd houses in this area, at least half have done this. At the same time they have also collectively seen offthe only roadside tea stall in the area that served all the service providers - the guards, the drivers, the domestics, the sweepers.

Who could study the rich?

Where does this kind of behaviour come from? You'd think if people had more than they need, they would be generous about it, and would see, reflecting on themselves, that others might want to have more as well. Not so. Until recently, every time I asked myself this question, I wondered if I was just being prejudiced, or imagining things. And then I read about the experiments carried out in the US by researchers Michael Kraus, Dacher Keltner, Paul Piffand others about what wealth does to people socially and psychologically - their conclusions are telling. (see box, page 26).

There haven't, to my knowledge, been any such studies in our region of the world. Indeed, in India, it's always struck me as strange that, while there are any number of books about the poor (perhaps they provide an easy subject because they're poor and don't have the power to refuse to be subjects of research), there are no studies about the rich or their behaviour. …

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