Magazine article The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE

The Week in Higher Education: News

Magazine article The Times Higher Education Supplement : THE

The Week in Higher Education: News

Article excerpt

After two years of taking flak from the Left for setting up an Pounds 18,000-a-year liberal arts college, A.C. Grayling is now in the cross hairs of the Right. His crime: not enough deference to the late Baroness Thatcher after writing in The Independent on 9 April that celebrations over her death are "understandable and justifiable" and that "death does not confer privileges". In The Times on 11 April, Libby Purves said the "modish entrepreneurial professor" was indistinguishable from the "crazed hard-Left" rabble-rousers taking part in "riotous street parties". Professor Grayling, who ironically has been accused of establishing a Thatcherite higher education institution, the New College of the Humanities, was condemned by Ms Purves for his "self-importance and half- baked anthropology" before she concluded that his views represent "all the smug, narrow, self-regarding, inhumane, mechanistic aridity of atheist academe". Enduring such an attack from the Iron Lady's defenders might yet win back Professor Grayling a few friends in the university fold.

When former Conservative leader William Hague boasted of drinking 14 pints a day as a student, most thought it unlikely. But apparently some students drink up to 100 units a day - more than three times the amount Mr Hague put away, according to the Daily Mail on 12 April. In a "warning to all teenagers and their parents", the paper related how one student, Emma Gould, "became hooked on alcopops at the age of 15 and was soon downing up to 100 units a day". She fitted her drinking around her lectures - starting early at 7am before collapsing at 6pm after a full day on campus. Ms Gould, then a biomedical student at the University of East Anglia, said she was soon heading to Ipswich's red-light district to work as a prostitute to fund her habit. Now teetotal, she shared her story to raise awareness about the perils of booze.

Australia is to slash A$2.3 billion (Pounds 1.6 billion) from the higher education budget to fund school reforms, The Australian reported on 14 April. The cuts by Julia Gillard's Labor government are the biggest to the sector since John Howard's 1996 budget. Craig Emerson, the tertiary education minister, said the government would place an "efficiency dividend" of 2 per cent on university funding in 2014 and 1. …

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