Magazine article HRMagazine

Employee with Attendance Problems Fails to Prove Bias

Magazine article HRMagazine

Employee with Attendance Problems Fails to Prove Bias

Article excerpt

Butler v. Crittenden County, 8th Cir., No. 12-1993 (March 5, 2013).

The trial court properly dismissed raceand sex-discrimination claims brought by an employee who was persistently late to work and insubordinate, despite her assertion that her rejection of her supervisor's sexual advances was the real reason for her discharge, the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled.

Tabby Butler was a deputy jailer for the Crittenden County jail for about nine years before her discharge. During her employment, Butler had several disciplinary issues involving insubordination and tardiness.

In September 2008, jail officials suspended Butler for writing disrespectful statements about her supervisor in a jail logbook. About one month later, she reported that the supervisor had harassed her by asking her out on dates and offering to take her out for meals. The employer told the supervisor to discuss only work matters with Butler and eventually transferred him to a different area so he would no longer be her supervisor.

In December 2008, jail officials suspended Butler for being late to work more than 60 times in the past year. Her employer ultimately terminated her for failing to show up to work on time and for being disrespectful to superiors and co-workers. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.