Magazine article The Spectator

The Multi-Culti KKK

Magazine article The Spectator

The Multi-Culti KKK

Article excerpt

EXPUNGE from your mind the image of hooded Klansmen with green teeth and tobacco juice seeping from the corners of their mouths. Forget, as well, those halcyon days when there were four million members of the Ku-Klux Klan, and thousands openly congregated in the cornfields of rural America burning 30ft-high crosses. That was all a long time ago, an era before the KKK, the great-granddaddy of extremist organisations, took a long hard look at itself and wised up. Just as New Labour had to shed the ideological baggage which had accumulated since the war, so too has the Bad Old Klan lately emerged as a reinvented Klan - a New Kool Klan.

The Klan's transformation seemed touch and go for a while, but the free market in extremism made it inevitable. Once, not so long ago, if one wished to join a `hategroup' there was the KKK and that was about it. But since the early 1990s redblooded Americans have been able to choose between sundry Christian Identity outfits, the Aryan Resistance Army or a tempting assortment of paramilitary compounds in Idaho. By comparison, the KKK looked out-of-date and out-of-touch, damaged by large-scale defections, factionalism, FBI informers and public antipathy. Two paths lay open to it: try to compete vainly with the murderers who blew up the federal building in Oklahoma City; or edge towards a populist and ostensibly moderate position.

Such a reformation did not come without trauma. Excitable traditionalists wanted to reignite a wave of racial terror to put the KKK back on the map, but the Young Turks who rose through the ranks in the 1980s argued that the Klan's ultimate aim - that is, a programme of national political and religious renewal - would be better realised through peaceful means. Its objectives now include American isolationism, drug testing for welfare recipients, closing the borders to immigration, protectionism, abolishing affirmative action, (re)outlawing homosexuality, abortion and interracial marriages, and opposing gun control. It was three factors in particular, however, which sealed the reformist faction's dominance: the firestorm at Waco which consumed the Branch Davidians, the seeming injustice of the O.J. Simpson trial, and the election of Bill Clinton. The hardline `rope-and-gun' presence was diluted by an influx of young initiates disgusted by the perceived tyrannical and anti-Christian ambitions of the federal government under President Clinton. The KKK's position on the Clinton administration was outlined succinctly for me by a high-ranking Klansman I befriended: `Liberalism is Satanism'.

By jettisoning disorganised violence and embracing 'moderation' the New Klan has cleverly embraced political correctness. Nearly every klavern, or local branch, allows women to be initiated, and some are now equally divided between the sexes. Even Catholics are no longer persona non grata. Trade unionists and immigrants (of the right colour, of course) are welcomed into its ranks. In a concession to healthy living, of the sort favoured by America's middle classes, the Klan has banned alcohol, drugs and, in some cases, tobacco from its rallies. Any Klansman spotted smoking dope is immediately reported to the police. Use of that emotional term, `cross-burning', is forbidden: today, it is referred to as `cross-lighting', the act symbolising the purity of Christ.

The embarrassing `white supremacy' kick is definitely out of favour - in front of journalists at least - and the hot buzzword now is `white separatism'. …

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