Magazine article The Spectator

Banned Wagon: Global

Magazine article The Spectator

Banned Wagon: Global

Article excerpt

NEWSPAPER readers will have seen a recent advertisement placed by Christian Aid in the form of a spoof boxing poster. The ad depicted a bullying `world-trade enforcer' poised with his bare knuckles, about to take on an emaciated figure by the name of Charles `Tomatoes are my Livelihood' Avaala. Mr Avaala, we learn, is a Ghanaian farmer who can no longer sell his tomatoes thanks to cheap imports from the EU. Those interested in joining the charity's campaign against `unfair trade rules' are invited to cut out a slip at the bottom and send it to 10 Downing Street: `Dear Tony Blair, Trade rules must allow governments in developing countries to protect and support poor farmers so they can grow their way out of poverty.'

Christian Aid is not wrong in sniffing out an injustice. It is absurd that EU farmers should be able to undercut those in Ghana thanks to 250 million of subsidies paid by European taxpayers, and that, as a result, Ghana is importing 10,000 tonnes of tomato concentrate from Europe a year. …

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