Magazine article Screen International

Getaway

Magazine article Screen International

Getaway

Article excerpt

Dir: Courtney Solomon. US. 2013. 90mins

Getaway has but one task -- deliver nonstop primo car chases -- and it can't even do that right. A failed attempt at being a grimy B-movie, this claustrophobic thriller commits the cardinal sin of being supremely ludicrous while having no sense of humour about its own preposterousness. Embodied by star Ethan Hawke's one-note intensity, Getaway grinds along joylessly, its wall-to-wall chase sequences more tedious than they are transporting.

With a notable exception near the end of the film involving a bravura unbroken POV shot from the front of a car careening recklessly through traffic, Getaway's car chases are numbing examples of endless motion and cacophony that add up to precious little.

Released by Warner Bros. in the US, Getaway will open during Labor Day weekend, a notoriously moribund time at the box office. Hawke's presence in the sleeper summer hit The Purge may help some, and younger audiences may be tempted to give this movie a try because of co-star Selena Gomez. But as its generic title implies, Getaway doesn't have enough of a marketing hook to stand out from the crowd.

Set in Sofia, Bulgaria, Getaway stars Hawke as Brent, a former race car driver who comes home one day to discover that his wife (Rebecca Budig) has been kidnapped. Brent quickly receives a call on his cell phone from the abductor (Jon Voight), who instructs him to steal a specific car out of a parking garage if he ever wants to see his beloved alive again. Reluctantly, Brent complies, driving around Sofia with the car's hothead owner (Gomez) in tow and following this nameless man's instructions.

Ideally, the film should offer mindless but high-octane jolts as Brent pilots his souped-up car through the city while being pursued by cops and trying to outwit this unseen kidnapper. But as directed by Courtney Solomon (An American Haunting), Getaway doesn't so much build in tension as it repeats an irritating formula over the course of its short running time.

With a notable exception near the end of the film involving a bravura unbroken POV shot from the front of a car careening recklessly through traffic, Getaway's car chases are numbing examples of endless motion and cacophony that add up to precious little. The film covers its bases early by mentioning that Brent's stolen car is armoured, which is meant to justify why it can withstand the beating it takes, but Solomon doesn't have the visual acumen to make these action sequences frenetic or balletic. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.