Magazine article Forced Migration Review

From the Editors

Magazine article Forced Migration Review

From the Editors

Article excerpt

Seeking asylum is not an unlawful act. Yet asylum seekers and refugees - men, women and even children - are increasingly detained and interned around the world, as are numbers of other migrants. Sometimes detained indefinitely and often in appalling conditions, they may suffer not only deprivation of their liberty but other abuses of their human rights too. Families are separated. Medical and psychological needs are ignored. Contact with the outside world is fractured. Rigid rules, surveillance and restraints degrade, humiliate and damage. And lack of information and hope leads to despair.

Detention may appear to be a convenient solution to states' political quest to manage migration but it is an expensive option and has lasting effects on people and on their capacity to be independent, self-sufficient and fulfilled members of the community when released. In the search fora more humane - and cheaper - approach, agencies and government authorities have trialled a variety of alternatives to detention, some of which are promising in terms of low levels of absconding, a greater degree of normality for the people involved, and improved chances of eventual integration. It will take shifts in attitudes as well as successful pilots, however, for alternatives to detention to become the norm.

For many people, their detention is the precursor to their deportation (or 'removal'). Here again, there seems to be a marked lack of care for people's rights and protection, as well as for their safe, successful and sustainable reintegration. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.