Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Briefly Noted

Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Briefly Noted

Article excerpt

* The park and recreation community mourns the loss of Nathaniel Washington, former NRPA president and commissioner of the Philadelphia Department of Recreation, who passed away on June 1, his 84th birthday. Washington's extensive career in recreation also included leadership positions at the Newark (New Jersey) Recreation and Parks Department and Fairleigh Dickinson University. As an active leader within NRPA, Washington served on the board of trustees from 1974-1982 and holds the distinction of being the association's first minority president in 1980. He also was a founder of the National Recreation and Park Ethnic Minority Society and participated as a member of many other park and recreation-related associations and organizations. Notably, he also held a lifeguard certification until the age of 78. Recreation professionals in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, as well as across the country, will miss his enthusiasm and leadership in recreation throughout the greater Philadelphia area.

* A park director in Pennsylvania has received accolades for his quick action that saved numerous lives during a shooting at a recent board supervisors' meeting in Pennsylvania. At the August 5 meeting in Ross Township, a disgruntled citizen opened fire, fatally wounding three and injuring at least six others. The gunman retreated, and West End Open Space Commission Executive Director Bernie Kozen was attending to the injured when he saw the shooter return. Kozen tackled the shooter, subduing him until police arrived. The alleged shooter was reportedly upset that the township had taken legal action against him due to excessive refuse on his property.

* From coast to coast, state parks are gearing up to celebrate the 20th anniversary of National Public Lands Day on Saturday, September 28, 2013. National Public Lands Day (NPLD) is the nation's largest single-day volunteer effort for public lands. In 2012, about 175,000 volunteers worked at 2,206 sites in every state, the District of Columbia and in many U.S. territories. NPLD volunteers collected an estimated 23,000 pounds of invasive plants, built and maintained 1,500 miles of trails, planted 100,000 trees, shrubs and other native plants, removed 500 tons of trash from trails and other places, and contributed $18 million through volunteer services to improve public lands across the country. …

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