Magazine article The Human Life Review

About This Issue . .

Magazine article The Human Life Review

About This Issue . .

Article excerpt

... we don't edit the Review in a thematic fashion, but as I read the final proofs for this issue, it struck me that playing through its pages was a recurrent theme of childhood betrayal. Abortion, of course, is the primal betrayal, snuffing out not only individual lives but family trees, and even, in a sense, as Caitlin Smith Gilson argues in her debut essay here, the author of life himself. "[Abortion's pogrom against contingency," she writes, "has in praxis destroyed man's access to the divine .. ("The Grand Refusal: Abortion's Pogrom Against Contingency," p. 48). Hers is an intellectually challenging argument with rich rewards for the attentive reader; we are pleased to welcome Dr. Gilson, who chairs the philosophy department at the Pontifical College Josephinum in Columbus, Ohio, to these pages.

Our senior editor Ellen Wilson Fielding has the snuffing out of childhood innocence on her mind ("Seeking Sanctuary" p. 39), and free-lance writer Leslie Fain, in her first original article for us, reports on how this loss of innocence is affecting the mating behavior of young women ("Why Do It for Free?", page 67).

Another senior editor, William Murchison, focuses on the images of little ones, insisting that the preciousness of every human life can be apprehended by serious engagement with photographs of children ("Life: Staring Us in the Face," page 7). Mr. Murchison has a new book coming out in September, The Cost of Liberty: The Life of John Dickinson-who has been described as "the most underrated of all the Founders" (ISI Books). …

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