Magazine article The Spectator

E Believe

Magazine article The Spectator

E Believe

Article excerpt

94 It takes them on outings for a treat. There is little chance of Believe in Magic being 'Believe in Magic & Sparkle,' says the Marks & Spencer television Christmas advertisement. The phrase is meant to suggest the shop, but it seems rather distant to me, either verbally or associatively (the shops, being lit by fluorescent tubes, are staring rather than sparkly). The popular name is Marks and Sparks, but merely as a rhyme.

There is already an outfit called Believe in Magic. 'Believe in Magic is a charity,' its website says, 'that spreads magic to the lives of seriously and terminally ill children.' confused with Marks & Spencer.

There is also some stuff called Ibuleve, a gel for the relief of muscular and rheumatic pain, strains and sprains. The Ibu- bit is related to the active ingredient, ibuprofen. The -leve no doubt suggests 'relieve'. But the two together sound like 'I believe'.

I don't know if studies have been done into the power of suggestion of the name, and its possible placebo effect. My husband hasn't heard of any, but I don't suppose the spectator he would.

Ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, has been available over the counter since 1983. …

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