Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Obituaries

Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Obituaries

Article excerpt

Seamus Heaney, 74, Irish poet, playwright, translator and recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature, died Aug. 30 in Dublin, Ireland. He grew up Roman Catholic in Northern Ireland and frequently alluded to "the troubles" in his poetry and prose. During his impressive career, he taught at Harvard, Oxford and the University of California, Berkeley. His daring translation of Beowulf, the earliest-known poem in English, was published in 2000 and became a surprise bestseller in the U.K. and U.S. As late as 2007, his large body of published work constituted roughly two-thirds of the sales of living poets in the United Kingdom, although he turned down the offer of U.K. laureateship in 1999, as he considered himself an Irish poet. Upon receiving the Nobel Prize in 1995, Heaney, an ardent supporter of the Palestinian cause, spoke hopefully of Israeli-Palestinian rapprochement; he publicly protested Israel's bombing of Gaza in 2009. The Nobel Laureate was an instrumental early patron of the Palestine Festival of Literature (PalFest), an increasingly important annual event that aims to strengthen cultural links between Palestine and the rest of the world.

William Healy Sullivan, 90, a career U.S. foreign service officer and the last U.S. ambassador to Iran, died Oct. 11 at an assisted living facility in Washington, DC. Born in Cranston, RI, he attended Brown University in 1943 and joined the Navy during World War II. Thanks to the GI Bill, following the war he earned a joint degree from Harvard and Tufts University's Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy in 1947, and joined the U.S. State Department shortly after his marriage to Marie Johnson. During his foreign service career he was posted in Bangkok, Calcutta, Tokyo, Saigon, Rome and The Hague. In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed him U.S. ambassador to Laos, in which capacity he helped broach negotiations with the North Vietnamese, which eventually culminated in the Paris peace talks that ended U. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.