Magazine article The Spectator

Seasonal Torture

Magazine article The Spectator

Seasonal Torture

Article excerpt

Three months until spring. Four months until the start of the cricket season. And only nine months until the radio starts playing 'Merry Xmas Everybody' again. Or have you heard enough of Christmas songs by now? Many of us had heard enough of them by Christmas 1988. Every October they return. The first strains of Shakin' Stevens emerging tentatively from high street shops.

Shane MacGowan and Kirsty MacColl, still bickering. Greg Lake, possibly alone now in believing in Father Christmas. Roy Wood's enormous beard, wishing it could be Christmas every day. And for three months of every year his wish is granted. Millions of Britons suffer the consequences.

(The only Golden Age Christmas hit you never hear any more is 'Another Rock'n' Roll Christmas' by Gary Glitter. I wonder why that might be. ) For this is a little corner of popular culture that has become completely stuck. One of the few recent additions to the canon has been Mariah Carey's 'All I Want For Christmas Is You', and that came out in 1994. It has always sounded like a new version of an old song, harnessing the now incarcerated spirit of Phil Spector, but Carey cowrote it herself, and this year it sold its millionth copy in the UK. As did, curiously, the Pogues and Ms MacColl's 'Fairytale of New York', which made its tenth visit to the Top 20 this December, reaching number 14. One can only marvel at such longevity, but this might have something to do with the absence of newer songs coming along to supersede it.

So why no new Christmas hits? One or two critics have pinned the blame on Matthew Bannister, the one-time Radio 1 controller who reoriented the station towards de yoof in the mid-1990s and compelled his older listeners to flee to Radio 2. The end of Top of the Pops in 2006 has also been cited, although both these events were symptoms of a wider change in pop music, rather than their cause. The cross-generational consensus we had enjoyed in the 1970s and 1980s was finally crumbling, and the young were listening to stuff older listeners could not abide. The thing about Christmas songs is that they need to appeal to everyone. Pop hardly ever tries to do that any more. It has almost forgotten how. …

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