Magazine article Sojourners Magazine

A Minimum of Justice

Magazine article Sojourners Magazine

A Minimum of Justice

Article excerpt

The movement for a fair minimum wage is bubbling up all over.

ON NOV. 5, 2013, the people of SeaTac, Wash., enacted the highest minimum wage in the country, $15 an hour, more than double the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour.

On Black Friday, the biggest shopping day of the year, Wal-Mart workers at more than 1,500 store locations conducted protests and informational pickets. Fast-food workers in more than 100 cities protested in front of McDonalds, KFC, and Taco Bell stores, calling for wage increases.

Across the U.S., a grassroots movement is blossoming to address the extreme inequality of wealth and wages. Led by low-wage workers and bolstered by faith community leaders, this movement is shining a spotlight on the glaring disparity of wages, wealth, and opportunity.

The wealthiest 1 percent of households, those with annual incomes over $555,000, now receives more than 21 percent of all income. Meanwhile, millions of low-wage workers subsist on the federal minimum wage, which is $15,080 a year for a full-time worker. As a result, many low-wage workers depend on charity and public subsidies such as food stamps and Medicaid to survive.

If the minimum wage had kept up with inflation since 1968, it would now be $10.74, enough to boost a family of three over the federal poverty line, according to the Economic Policy Institute. If the minimum wage had increased at the pace of worker productivity, it would be $18.72 an hour today.

Federal legislation has been introduced to raise the minimum wage over three years to $10.10. Polls indicate broad public support for this proposal. Seventy percent of people in the U.S. said they supported raising the federal minimum wage, according to a CBS News poll in December 2013. But this proposal faces bleak prospects in our gridlocked Congress.

This political paralysis has pushed organizing efforts to the state and local level, where living wage and minimum wage campaigns have won real results. Four states passed laws in 2013 hiking the minimum wage, while in nine states it automatically increased with a legislated cost-of-living adjustment. Twentyone states now have minimum wages higher than the federal minimum wage. In 2014, there will be campaigns to raise minimum wages in at least 11 states, according to the National Employment Law Project. …

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