Magazine article The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education

Uncensored

Magazine article The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education

Uncensored

Article excerpt

FEMINIST ICON SAYS COLLEGE HAS BEEN OVERSOLD - Gloria Steinern, the icon of the women's liberation movement in the late 1960s and 70s, the founder of Ms. magazine and the Women's Media Center, wowed an audience at the National Press (Hub in Washington, D.C., in November with her energy, ideas and yes, stunning good looks (she is 79 - bom in 1934 - going on 39!). She also remains provocative. In answer to my question about if she regarded it as a "win, a good thing" that 60 percent-and-growing of college students are female (and an even higher percentage for Hispanic and black females), she repliai immediately: "It is not so much a problem about men but a fiict that college itself has been so oversold! Women should be able to have a wide range of jobs and equal salaries as men in the workplace without having to go to college (and go into huge debt)." It's a good point. New studies show that now increasingly, men are dropping out of college to work as apprentices, study part time at night, and get professional certificates, while women remain in college, incur huge debt in majors that increasingly won't enable them to pay back their debts if they even are able to land a job.

HISPANIC IMMIGRANT FAMILIES REMAIN RELATIVELY STRONG - In December the president switched from health care to a new/old focus on income equality in the United States (MSNBC) commentator Chuck Todd calls it his "deja pivot"). He emphasizes an increase in the minimum wage and more unemployment insurance. But a report by the department of sociology at Ohio State University last September puts the onus for poverty and income gaps on another factor altogether - "balkanized" American families. "For all U.S. bom children, living arrangement was a strong indicator of poverty," the report found. "Children are much less likely to live in poverty and instead more likely to benefit in education from family stability, increased parent time and higher economic resources," the study concludes. Among minorities, some 54 percent of Hispanic children were living in families with a married father and mother either both working (33 percent) or where only the father worked (21 percent). Only 29 percent of black children lived in such dual-income (24 percent) or single-income (5 percent) families. Similarly 9 percent of Hispanic children were living with their grandparents while 15 percent of black children did. "An overwhelming majority of immigrants' children, regardless of educational level, embrace marriage and eschew divorce, cohabitation and remarriage after divorce," the report concludes. …

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