Magazine article Sculpture

LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS: SculptureNow 2013

Magazine article Sculpture

LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS: SculptureNow 2013

Article excerpt

The Mount

For 16 seasons, sculptor Ann Jon has organized outdoor exhibitions in Western Massachusetts, attracting increasingly able artists as time has gone on. The venues for Sculpture-Now have also changed, as the show migrated from the Berkshire Botanical Gardens to the streets of Stockbridge, Great Barrington, and Lenox. This past summer, "Confluence" was installed at Sculpture-Now's most spacious and appropriate site yet-the vast acreage of The Mount, summer home of the writer Edith Wharton.

Some of the boldest work was the simplest, showing up best in the landscape. Traffic barriers inspired Matt Harding's assertive The Thirteenth Piece Was a Shape Switch; despite a strong interplay of angles and zebra stripes, there was not much lingering subtlety. The same may be said for Gary Orlinsky's very visible Proscenium in Green and Bob Turan's Heat Wave, although both looked great in their environs. Steven Dono's boldly constructed Medusa Oblongata could be mistaken for a playground element, except for the hawser rope delicately held by a mannequin hand. I failed to see the message in Thomas Matsuda's phallic Purification- three short logs and one tall one held upright and charred to charcoal-but I give him credit for nerve.

From afar, Robin Tost's Mrs. Wharton Takes a Walk looked like an angel wearing a hat. In close-up profile, the wit of the plywood piece appeared: a caricature of a woman in Edwardian dress-bustle, long skirts, leg-o'-mutton sleeves, and feathered hat-who might have been better advised to wear a color other than white. Nature's Laugh II, though maybe a bit heavy-handed, was amusing. Gunnar Theel's simple little house stood on its ridgepole with wild grasses growing atop what should have been its cellar- the built world upended and on its way to ruin.

Allen Williams's Erratic might have been mistaken for such-a boulder left behind by retreating glaciers- but it was constructed of several huge stones. …

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