Magazine article The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education

Uncensored

Magazine article The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education

Uncensored

Article excerpt

GERMAN TYPE APPRENTICESHIPS IN AMERICA?

Paid apprenticeships in companies that then guarantee graduates a job and continual training have been featured recently in The New York Times and on PBS. It's a system that has worked for centuries in Germany, where today skilled blue-collar careers still are highly valued, unions cooperate with management to set curriculum and wages, and there is a commitment to hire and retain citizen careerists. BMW is conducting apprenticeships in its manufacturing plants in the U.S.A. But enthusiastic American apprentices admit the biggest problem is a "stigma" about not going to college. "Apprenticeships in the U.S. would require a massive cultural attitude change," they say.

CAMPUS BANKING: THE LATEST LEGISLATIVE FOCUS

One of the first rites-of-passage of a new college student on campus is maneuvering through the aggressive marketers of bank cards, bank accounts and bank loans. Knowing that most students must have their bank deals co-signed by their parents, banks drool about students as desirable customers. But even more, banks have found university administrators particularly eager to make deals with them to enable students and their parents to charge tuition and other expenses, while a percentage is given back to the college development office (disclosure: for years I have had a CAL Alumni BankAmerica credit card). This spring, legislators on bicameral Banking, Finance, and the Ways and Means Congressional Committees have been trying to insert language that would require more disclosure, transparency and information on deals between banks and universities into Title IV's cash management rules that are presently under revision by the Department of Education. The concern about campus banking, however, is pretty much drowned out by the debate over less lucrative college loan interest rates to be paid by graduating students.

MILITARY VETS IN COLLEGE FACE WORK EXPERIENCE CREDIT DILEMMA

The growth of military veterans enrolling full-time in college (67 percent from 2009-12) is one of the success stories of American higher education. New federal law provides in-state tuition to any service member who has at least 90 days of active-duty service (or up to $17,000 in cash for private school enrollment). Many if not most of these military students will be "non-traditional" (not the 18-22 cohort) with years of work or life experience. There is growing demand that these experiences be given college credit... but how? Increasingly most military volunteers are assigned to combat roles, leaving the 'skills' training from radio techs, mechanics and even food and supply management to outside contractors. …

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