Magazine article Sculpture

SARASOTA, FLORIDA: Sarasota Season of Sculpture 2014, Season VII

Magazine article Sculpture

SARASOTA, FLORIDA: Sarasota Season of Sculpture 2014, Season VII

Article excerpt

SARASOTA, FLORIDA: Sarasota Season of Sculpture 2014, Season VII

Every two years, the Sarasota Season of Sculpture, headed by Susan McLeod, installs sculptures on Bayfront Drive between the attractive waterfront walkway and the busy Tamiami Trail. This year, curators Fayanne Hayes and Andrew Maass selected 18 sculptures by eight artists; one sculptor had as many as six pieces included, others were represented by only one work. These Season VII works were situated among remaining sculptures from previous seasons, including Seward Johnson's Unconditional Surrender. Most of the general public and some members of the arts community love this work; others dislike it intensely for its lack of originality, as if that were an issue in art today.

Heinz Aeschlimann is no newcomer to Season of Sculpture; his work has been included in earlier seasons. Composition brought to mind musical notes, but in largerthan-life burnished steel. Aeschlimann is an engineer who worked skillfully and closely with the surrounding environs, as did several other artists in the exhibition.

Linda Howard's tall steel archway resembled an entrance, and in fact, it introduced visitors to the waterfront. She cuts and polishes aluminum tubing, changing it from simple metal into bright, gestural surfaces that reflect light. The tall poles also recalled the boat masts and fishing poles visible on the nearby bay.

Somewhat more inland, six works by Israeli-born Boaz Vaadia ranged from family groups (including one with a dog) to a large, single bust of a figure called Zamir, which, to me, was the most successful, created with bluestone and slate. Formed of stacked, horizontal slabs of stone, Vaadia's figures recall the construction of walls or ancient figures dug up from an archaeological site.

On a median between the street and the water, the installations were more diverse. Four large works by Hans Van de Bovenkamp framed the site, from the large steel Red Trunk to Sagg Portal #6, a grand, Baroquestyle frame. …

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