Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Obituaries

Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Obituaries

Article excerpt

Hashim Khan, approximately 100, a Pakistani squash player, died Aug. 18 at his home in Aurora, CO. Born in what is now northern Pakistan, but at the time was part of the British Raj of India, he began to play squash at a young age and even became the squash coach of the British Air Force. In the 1950s, at the peak of his squash career, he was world champion no less than seven times. He cultivated the squash careers of family members as well, many of whom went on to win their own honors and medals around the globe. The family became known in the squash world as the "Khan Dynasty." After moving to the United States in the 1960s, Khan was credited with changing the nature of the sport, previously associated with an elite white demographic. He coached in both Detroit and Denver, appealing to non-white segments of the population. Many call him the greatest squash player ever.

Samih al-Qasim, 75, one of Palestine's most respected and loved poets, died Aug. 19 after battling cancer for many years. Born in Zarqa' in the then-British mandate of Transjordan, he moved with his family back to their ancestral village of Rama in the Galilee after World War II. The poet was just 9 years old in 1948, but recalled in his memoir that his earliest memories were from that tumultuous time, and his poetry makes frequent references to this important date. He published the first of his 25 volumes of poetry, Processions of the Sun, at the age of 18. Some of al-Qasim's poetry reflected his long interest in Pan-Arabism, and he frequently refers to his infatuation with Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt in the 1960s. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.