Magazine article ASEE Prism

Opening the Doors of Web-Based Instruction

Magazine article ASEE Prism

Opening the Doors of Web-Based Instruction

Article excerpt

Over the past 20 years, advances in portable computer hardware, specialized software, and accompanying assistive technologies have helped make classroom instruction and participation more accessible to students with physical disabilities. Recently, however, the growing use of another computer resource, the World Wide Web, has created a host of problems for vision- and hearing-impaired students.

Left unresolved, these problems could limit such students' access to course material and, in some cases, entire classes and degree programs. Also, Web-only content not fully accessible to disabled students may violate the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Interpreting Web page image files (graphically represented, non-text elements of a page) poses the most significant problem for disabled Web users. Blind students, for example, often rely on speech synthesizers that read aloud Web page text. If site builders don't provide descriptive tags (which can be read by a synthesizer) for the page's images, the information those images contain is not conveyed to the blind user. This is a serious problem when the images contain essential information, such as mathematical formulas, charts, graphs, and so on.

Deaf users encounter a similar problem on sites that feature sound and video clips. Unless the clips are accompanied by written transcripts, deaf users can't access the information.

Today, as more and more educators create Web-based materials to accompany their courses, and virtual classrooms become commonplace thanks to asynchronous learning networks, accessibility concerns are assuming even greater urgency, according to Jon Gunderson, coordinator of assistive communication and information technology at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). "As this type of technology becomes more popular, and more and more courses begin to use it, we need to learn how to make it more accessible," Gunderson says. …

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