Magazine article Sculpture

Atlanta

Magazine article Sculpture

Atlanta

Article excerpt

Scott Ingram

Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia

Scott Ingram's "Blue Collar Modernism" Included collage sketches, paintings, and sculptural Installa tions that underscore his Interest In modern architecture and functional building materials. Following the exhibition title, the work made a promise to explore aspects of Mod- ernism that are often conflated and at times contradictory-on the one hand, our economic, social, and cultural condition after the rise of Industrialization and urbanization; and on the other, a set of aesthetic codes generally associated In the U.S. with Clement Greenberg, though conjured up here by Ingram's walltext references to Jackson Pollock and Abstract Expressionism, De Stijl, Alvar Aalto, Irving Gill, Mies van der Rohe, and Eero Saarinen. Although these references could be didacti- cally opaque, the resulting formal contributions were quite productive.

The juxtaposition of two pieces In particular fleshed out the potential of this new body of work. Untitled Number 23 (2014), one of Ingram's "Sheetrock Paintings," applies a high modern aesthetic to carpentry, signaled by what Ingram cleverly describes as "drywall Impasto." The formal structure of the work explicitly refers to the use of plywood In repairing damaged drywall. A 180- degree turn then placed the viewer at the foot of a massive sculpture. Stack (2014), three blocks of strapped plywood, reached all the way up to the ceiling. While the configuration certainly referenced Brancusi's Endless Column In a marriage of art historical reference and the use of manufactured construction materials, It also prompted an unsafe feeling In the viewer, like standing beneath a work by Richard Serra. …

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