Magazine article Business Credit

Tips for Practicing Mindfulness in a Multitasking Workplace

Magazine article Business Credit

Tips for Practicing Mindfulness in a Multitasking Workplace

Article excerpt

Google, eBay, Intel and General Mills offer classes on it. So do Harvard Business School, Ross School of Business and Claremont Graduate University, among other campuses. Mindfulness is not just a corporate trend, but a proven method for success.

Mindfulness-being focused and fully present in the here and now-is good for individuals and good for a business's bottom line. How can people practice it in a workplace where multitasking is the norm, and concerns for future profits can add to workplace stress?

"Even if a company doesn't make it part of the culture, employees and managers can substitute their multitasking habits with mindfulness in order to reduce stress and increase productivity," says Dr. Romie Mushtaq, a neurologist with expertise in mind-body medicine and mindful living. "The result that you and your colleagues will notice is that you're sharper, more efficient and more creative."

Dr. Romie says the physiological benefits of clearing away distractions and living in the moment have been documented in many scientific and medical studies. "Practicing mindfulness, whether it's simply taking deep breaths, or actually meditating or doing yoga, has been shown to alter the structure and function of the brain, which is what allows us to learn, acquire new abilities and improve memory," she says. "Advances in neuroimaging techniques have taught us how these mindfulnessbased techniques affect neuroplasticity. Multitasking, on the other hand, depresses the brain's memory and analytical functions, and it reduces blood flow to the part of the right temporal lobe, which contributes to our creative thinking. In today's marketplace, creativity is key for innovation, sustainability and leadership."

Dr. Romie offers these three tips for practicing mindfulness in a multitasking business:

1. Focus on a single task for an allotted amount of time. You might say, "For 15 minutes, I'm going to read through my emails, and then for one hour, I'm going to make my phone calls," Dr. Romie says.

If your job comes with constant interruptions that demand your attention, take several deep breaths and then prioritize them. Resist the urge to answer the phone every time it rings, unless it's your boss. If someone asks you to drop what you're doing to help with a problem, it's OK to tell them, "I'll be finished with what I'm doing in 10 minutes, then I'm all yours. …

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