Magazine article Screen International

Film and TV "Not Doing Enough" to Combat Climate Change

Magazine article Screen International

Film and TV "Not Doing Enough" to Combat Climate Change

Article excerpt

One day's shoot on flagship BBC nature doc Planet Earth can generate 28 tonnes of carbon.

The film and TV industries are "not doing enough" to combat climate change, according to a panel of industry experts.

Speaking at the third annual 'Greening the Screen' event organised by BAFTA and the BFI on Wednesday, Howard Ella, producer on BBC crime drama The Interceptor, said:

"Across the industry, we are absolutely not doing enough. Producers have so much power and the impetus for change has to come from the very top."

On average, the production of one hour of television generates 9.4 tonnes of carbon.

The industry is "generally the worst culprit when it comes to carbon emissions" according to BBC cinematographer Paul Williams, who revealed that one day's shoot on flagship BBC nature doc Planet Earth generated 28 tonnes of carbon.

He added: "One tonne of carbon takes up the volume of around one London bus, that's the weight of a small baby elephant."

On BBC series Wonders of the Monsoon, Williams said, they saved at least six return flights by opting to use international camera crew who already lived on location. …

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