Magazine article Techniques

Shipping Teachers out to Bring Them on Board

Magazine article Techniques

Shipping Teachers out to Bring Them on Board

Article excerpt

School-to-work partnerships are relying more on teacher internships and inservice training classes to win over skeptical educators.

Many school-to-- work advocates say convincing teachers of the initiative's merits remains a big hurdle, but placing them in internships at local businesses seems to show them the need for education programs that link with the workplace.

Massachusetts, for example, aims to triple the 800 teachers in its internship program last academic year. "They all come back a little warmer to the concept and see the value of the students [experiencing] what they saw," says David Singer, a spokesman for the state school-to-work office.

Other states and localities are using teacher in-service training to pitch school-to-work.

Teachers at Homestead High School in Mequon, Wis., can take a 10-hour course on school-to-work sponsored by the school district. "Once they became more informed about the law and its intent and about what we were doing here in Homestead, their awareness brought support," says Pam Rochford, the school's school-to-work coordinator. …

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