Magazine article The Spectator

Portrait of the Week

Magazine article The Spectator

Portrait of the Week

Article excerpt

Home

Philip Hammond, the foreign secretary, told Parliament that Britain reserved the right to supply arms to Ukraine, as 'We could not allow the Ukrainian armed forces to collapse.' The Prince of Wales, embarking on a six-day tour of the Middle East, said on Radio 2 that he 'particularly wanted to show solidarity really, deep concern for what so many of the Eastern Christian churches are going through in the Middle East'. John Longworth, the head of British Chambers of Commerce, called for a referendum on membership of the European Union to be held in 2016, a year earlier than David Cameron, the Prime Minister, has promised, in order to end uncertainty. Boris Johnson, the Mayor of London, said the same. Margaret Hodge, the Labour MP, decided not to stand for election as Mayor of London: 'I actually think the time is right for us to have a non-white mayor.' Marks & Spencer put on sale boxes of eggs guaranteed to have double yolks.

Lowell Goddard, a High Court judge from New Zealand was named as the head of an inquiry, with statutory powers and a new panel, into historical child sex abuse in England and Wales. Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner, said that guarding the embassy of Ecuador, where Julian Assange (wanted by the Swedish police) took refuge more than two years ago, was 'sucking our resources', with a cost estimated at £10 million. Four people, one a girl of four, died when a truck loaded with sand crashed on a hill in Bath. The Premier League sold television rights to its games to Sky and BT for a record £5.136 billion. A.P. McCoy, aged 40, 19 times champion jump jockey, announced he would retire by the end of the season. Ziferblat, a chain of cafés, opened a branch in Manchester, with free coffee but a charge of 5p a minute for customers.

Ed Miliband the leader of the Labour party, wrote to Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies threatening them with being put on a blacklist by a future Labour government because their 'affairs are still shrouded in darkness' with 'wealth hidden away'. Gibraltar's chief minister, Fabian Picardo, the leader of the Socialist Labour party, responded with fury, saying that Gibraltar was no tax haven and that Spain was already using Mr Miliband's letter 'as a rod with which to beat us'. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.