Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Obituaries

Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Obituaries

Article excerpt

Mary Eoloff, 82, a longtime peace activist, died of heart and lung problems on Oct. 11. She and her late husband, Nicholas, who died in May, were the adoptive parents of the Israeli nuclear whistleblower Mordechai Vanunu, who, after serving an 18-year prison sentence, is not allowed to leave Israel. Eoloffwas known for founding a local chapter of Pax Christi, as a co-founder of the Peace Studies Task Force and a member of Middle East Peace Now, and for helping Central American refugees in the Overground Railroad.

Ali Mazrui, 81, a prominent professor of African and Islamic Studies, died Oct. 12 of natural causes. Born in colonial Mombasa, Mazrui was educated in Kenya before earning his B.A. from Manchester University, his M.A. from Columbia University, and his Ph.D. from Oxford University. He taught at Makerere University in Uganda as well as at the University of Michigan and Binghamton University in New York. Known for his work in international politics and North-South relations, he was the author of more than 20 books and wrote and hosted the public television series "The Africans:?A Triple Heritage," which explored the continent's indigenous, Islamic and Western influences.

Serena Shim, 30, a Lebanese-born American journalist, was killed Oct. 19 in a car crash near the Syrian border with Turkey. An experienced international journalist working for Tehran-based Press TV, she had been assigned to cover the siege of Kobane. Just days before her death, the Turkish government accused her of being a spy. The exact details of her death are disputed and unclear.

Reyhaneh Jabbari, 26, an Iranian political prisoner, was executed Oct. 25 after being convicted of murdering Morteza Sarbandi, a former intelligence officer. The interior designer claimed she was sexually assaulted and killed Sarbandi in self-defense. Her case became highly publicized, and Amnesty International, the U.N. and the EU, describing the investigation as flawed, all called for amnesty.

Mansour Hobeika, 73, a Maronite Catholic bishop, died Oct. 28 in a Paris hospital. Born in Hadath, Lebanon, in September 2002 he became the bishop of Zahle and taught religious law at Sagesse University. He was known for criticizing the sale of Lebanese land to foreigners. …

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